Fishing in New England in September

Fishing in New England in September is awesome! The summer residents and tourists are gone, the lakes and ponds are vacant during the week and not that busy on the weekends. The days are warm, the nights cool, the sky is a brilliant blue, the clouds are pure white and the trees are magnificent in their fall colors of reds, orange, yellow, gold, brown and green.

Add to that scene a little snow on the mountaintops and you know your in God’s country.

Fall fishing in Northern New England is fantastic as the fish don’t see many fishermen during the week and only a spattering of fishermen on the weekends. One reason being hunting season is on for deer, (Archery only), bear, and coyote. In October upland birds and ducks are the choices.

New Hampshire’s deer season for muzzleloaders opens in October.

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Many fishermen will combine a hunt in the morning with a fishing excursion in the afternoon.

Bass fishermen hold tournaments right through November. In fact, the last few years there has been a tournament in December. You have to give the bass boys credit for not wanting to pack it in and put their boats away for the winter.

Picture this: You and your buddy drive to your favorite lake on a Tuesday and back your boat down the ramp. You look around and there aren’t any areas of the beach roped off, the weed inspector has long gone home as he isn’t needed when the water temperatures reach the mid to low fifties. most of the docks have been pulled up on shore, the floats have been put away and the boats are in storage for the winter.

You launch your boat and park the truck. Your partner picks you up on the shore and you manage to get in the boat without getting your feet wet.

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You fire up the engine and idle off while the engine warms up. When everyone’s ready you push the throttle forward and your boat jumps up on plane. It is a Cooooooooooold run to your first spot and your face is bright red when you ease off of the throttle and the boat settles down. You step up on the front deck and let the trolling motor fall slowly and gently into the water.

Your first cast hits the water and immediately a bass yanks it deeper into the lake. You set the hook and after a short struggle the bass comes to the boat. Your partner nets it and you take the hook out and release the three-pound beauty. As you jabber on about what a beautiful fish that was your partner hollers, “Get the net”. He has hooked into another New England largemouth that is trying to pull your rod into the lake. The fight is on and this largemouth doesn’t want to get in the boat. Finally, she comes to the net and is more than happy to jump out of your hands back into the lake.
Next a 5-pound plus smallmouth tears your bait to a shred but you are lucky enough to get a picture of him before you release him.

You and your partner catch and release well over 30 fish each by the end of the day.

It’s time to quit for the day so you head back to the ramp where your partner backs the truck down the ramp, you load the boat and pull out onto the highway and head for home.

But, on the way home, what do you talk about? The bright blue sky, the few puffy white clouds that floated passed your boat, the autumn colors and the lack of any competition on the lake.

This is not a fairytale, this is fishing in New England in the fall.

Come on up and join us, you won’t regret it.

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