The Art of Kicking Fish

Our Best Nature Videos of 2019. #1 Dolphins Kicking Fish

Our Best Nature Videos of 2019. #1 Dolphins Kicking Fish Although this dramatic feeding technique is very commonly used by dolphins in specific parts of Florida and other places, this is the first time the technique has been recorded in a way that enables people to see exactly what is happening. From ground level, people just see a fish leaving the water and somersaulting high in the air. From an aerial perspective you can see that the dolphins are waiting for the fish to try and circle around them. When the fish gets in the strike zone of the dolphins tail, you can see the dolphin looking at the fish and lining up the kick. It's a difficult technique to learn, and not all dolphins know how to do it. However, once learned, it provides an obvious advantage over simply chasing a fish and catching it with the mouth. A quick, precise flip of the tail and dinner is served, versus chasing a fish down and catching it with the mouth which can often take a few minutes and require a lot of energy. National Geographic did a story about this video and the fish kicking technique, however, you need to have a subscription to read the article, so here's a link to another article about the video in Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/prep-their-next-meal-dolphins-punt-thrash-and-trap-their-prey-180973555/ ..#nature #dolphins #fish #amazing #outdoors #wildlife #ocean National Geographic Animal Planet BBC Earth #boating #kayaking #canoe #seethroughcanoe #ilovefl #florida #tampa #stpetersburgfl #animals #naturephotography #awesome #aerial #drone #sup #paddleboarding #paddle #fishing #dolphin Smithsonian Magazine

Posted by See Through Canoe on Thursday, January 9, 2020

 

Dolphins Kicking Fish

Although this dramatic feeding technique is very commonly used by dolphins in specific parts of Florida and other places, this is the first time the technique has been recorded in a way that enables people to see exactly what is happening. From ground level, people just see a fish leaving the water and somersaulting high in the air. From an aerial perspective you can see that the dolphins are waiting for the fish to try and circle around them. When the fish gets in the strike zone of the dolphins tail, you can see the dolphin looking at the fish and lining up the kick. It’s a difficult technique to learn, and not all dolphins know how to do it. However, once learned, it provides an obvious advantage over simply chasing a fish and catching it with the mouth. A quick, precise flip of the tail and dinner is served, versus chasing a fish down and catching it with the mouth which can often take a few minutes and require a lot of energy.

Avatar
Fishing Magazine, Coastal Angler & The Angler Magazine is your leading source for freshwater fishing and saltwater fishing videos, fishing photos, saltwater fishing.
X