Hunting Wahoo By Capt. Drew Demaree

Fall is finally here, one of my favorite times of the year to go offshore fishing. This time of year also brings a good consistent wahoo and tuna bite. Somebody say WAHOO?

Just so happens that wahoo is my favorite meat fish to fight, catch and eat.

I like to troll along the ledge because Wahoo are very structure orientated

Let’s talk about wahoo! On a typical day when I am targeting Wahoo I like to troll along the ledge because Wahoo are very structure orientated.

The ledge provides many drop offs and rock mounds that attract bait fish and other bottom dwellers living amongst live bottom.

Pay close attention to your sounder when looking for schools of baitfish and larger Wahoo marks along the ledge. Wahoo are a mid water column fish and typically run in small packs.  So where there’s one, there’s more!

When the wahoo are chewing, a good day can bring upwards of 10- 15 Wahoo strikes

When the wahoo are chewing, a good day can bring upwards of 10- 15 Wahoo strikes. Catching them is a different story. I like to start the day pulling 3 to 4 high-speed lures trolling around 10-14 knots.

This enables you to cover more ground for a couple quick rips down the ledge to get that first morning bite. For my high speed spread, I’ll have two-bullet shape lures with trolling weights on the corners.

Just beyond the trolling weights I’ll pull two of my custom cup face Head Striker lures, one out of the chair and the other off the bridge in the shotgun position. I rig my lures with 10/0 double hook sets on cable.

After the morning bite slows down, I will pull an 8 rod bait spread going 5-6 knots. For my ballyhoo rigs I use Islanders and chuggers on 130 lb. single strand wire with an 8/0 mustad hook.

One of my favorite baits for wahoo is a deep, dark colored Islander on a planer. On some days when the bite isn’t on top the planer rod can be the day maker.

When hooked up it’s really important to keep the boat moving

When hooked up it’s really important to keep the boat moving by alternating the gears. If the fish feels any slack in the line it will turn its head pealing off line and likely throwing the hook.

So get out there while the bite is good and go make some striped memories. Good luck out there!

Captain Drew Demaree / Charleston Fishing Charters
fishingcharterscharlestonsc.com

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