Stuart Deep Sea: Oct. 2018

King mackerel and snapper will generate smiles like these on the faces of happy Safari 1 anglers. Photo credit: Safari 1.

October’s ocean will be one that is in motion on many different levels. A large biomass of mullet (which began arriving in our near shore waters over the last several weeks) will continue to stream through our fishing seascape and pause to take up residence in Martin County`s estuaries, which will also include inlet and surf zones. This seasonal movement of mullet and their arrival in our local waters, heralds the official beginning of fall and the journey mullet take. These large schools of mullet and other baitfish have the tendency to attract and tow many species of hungry, travelling fish along with them, including pelagics like king and Spanish mackerel, cobia, dolphin, and sailfish. Resident species are in turn activated by the arrival of vast expanses of these baitfish and give local anglers a reference point for nailing down a good spot to fish. While these baitfish typically stay close in proximity to the surf and beach zone and points inside of the inlet (through the lagoon and river), they will sometimes be seen several miles off the beach.  Many other species of migrating fish will arrive in the “deep sea zone” during October, as they are propelled by the same forces of nature that motivate baitfish into their seasonal journey.

Wind velocities will noticeably increase this month, making for a choppy offshore playing field. Near shore reefs in 50 to 60 feet of water will become the “go to zone” during these rougher days, allowing fishing crews to take it slow into choppy conditions and make the first offshore stop on a vast array of reef structures that are within three to four nautical miles of our St. Lucie Inlet (for GPS coordinates of these reefs, go to martinreefs.com).

Strategies that highlight bottom fishing will continue to be highly desirable, as lane and mutton snapper will solidly populate these near shore bottom structures, along with grouper and other species of edible “ground fish”. Cobia will also be attracted to these same reef sites and become a prized “grocery trophy” for deep sea anglers this month.  So, in October, explore the many varied reef sites that are just within a few miles of the inlet and round your fish up, close to home.

FORECAST BY: Capt. Rocky Carbia
Safari I
Pirates Cove Resort and Marina
4307 SE Bayview St. Port Salerno, Florida
Reservations: (772) 334-4411
www.Safari-1.com

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